How to learn Kubernetes ? “Kubernetes in action” the answer !

Few months ago I started the Manning Access Early Program (MEAP) for one of the books that I think is the best resource for all the newbies who want to start studying Kubernetes and for all the experts who want to dig into its details and internals.

It’s “Kubernetes in action” written by Marko Luksa , one of my colleagues in Red Hat as software engineer in the Cloud Enablement Team.

First of all, I can guarantee on the author ! Marko has a really deep knowledge of Kubernetes and OpenShift and luckily for us, he decided to write a book about that. He is a very nice person, always available to help you to solve any problem that you are facing with Kube. I was lucky to start working with Marko when the EnMasse project was born.

Speaking about the book, it’s awesome !

After the first part introducing Docker and Kubernetes and the first steps with it, the book moves to the core concepts.

You can find all information about what pods are and how you can deploy containers (so your applications) with them and finally how you can replicate pods. Then how to make applications accessible inside and outside the cluster using services and how to use storage for having a persistence layer for your data shared between pods and always available on restarts. Do you want to know how your application is configurable even with sensitive data (i.e. certificates and credentials), you will find such information in this book !

After covering all these core concepts, the last big part has the objective to bring you more deep information about Kubernetes. First of all, the new StatefulSets feature which allows to deploy stateful applications with their stable identity and stored data across restarts. Then a really interesting look to Kubernetes internals speaking about all the components which made it : etcd, the API server, the controller manager and all the other stuff. Managing resources is another interesting chapter describing how you can request specific resources in terms of CPU and memory for the containers even setting limits on them.

But one of the big advantage of using a container orchestrator like Kubernetes is the possibility to scale your infrastructure based on the load you have against the applications. You will find this information about auto-scaling on CPU utilization or custom metrics !

The final part is enriched by best practices for developing cloud native applications which run on Kubernetes. In order to learn a new technology, knowing how it works is the main part but it’s more useful having examples and patterns provided by expert people like Marko.

Finally, the book ends explaining how it’s possible to extend Kubernetes defining new components and custom API objects so showing a powerful feature like its extensibility.

In conclusion, I think that this book deserves to be read and to be part of your books collection even because after reading it you’ll become expert on two technologies for developing cloud native applications : not only Kubernetes but OpenShift as well ! 🙂

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